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PRESS : ABOUT CORA WEN

Articles about Cora Wen

Trial Will Test Benefits of Yoga and Stretching Among People at Risk of Diabetes, Heart Disease

UCSF is enrolling participants in a one-year study of the health benefits of yoga and stretching among overweight adults with metabolic syndrome, after a 10-week pilot study yielded promising results.

The “Practicing Restorative Yoga or Stretching for Metabolic Syndrome,” or PRYSMS, study is being conducted in partnership with UC San Diego and funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. It will consist of frequent group classes as well as at least three days per week of home practice, with half of the participants assigned to gentle yoga and the other half to active stretching.

Your LivingHealthy Guide to Yoga

With so many kinds of yoga classes offered around town or at your gym, it can be hard to choose the right one for you, especially if you aren’t well versed in the yogi language. For example, while Hot and Power Yoga focus on blasting calories, Yin and Taoist are more meditative, and Therapeutic is great for anyone suffering from a physical injury or trauma. In this informative slideshow, LivingHealthy expert and founder of Yoga Bloom, Cora Wen, breaks down 12 of the most popular types of yoga, explaining everything from what they’re about and what to expect in a class to what celebrities and personality types can be found bending, posing and chanting their way through classes. Namaste!

What’s Up with Yoga Inversions? The Low-down on Headstands

From injury rehab to circus moves, there’s a fit for you.

These days, yoga is taught in a wide range of dedicated venues, from small, local studios to glitzy, spa-like franchises of large international corporations. It’s also offered as an “added value” at gyms, fitness clubs, wellness and community centers. 

As a Therapeutic Yoga educator for over 20 years and a traditional Iyengar practitioner for more than 30, I have experienced the ins and outs of scores of studios, worldwide. (Iyengar is a precise alignmentbased yoga.) Here’s how I recommend you select a studio:

First, ask yourself what you want:

Once youve narrowed down your options for the type of yoga you want to practice (see find the right yoga studio), its time to start shopping for teachers.

Workout Trend Alert: Hot Hot Hot

…At The Sweat Shoppe in North Hollywood, California, instructors including Naomi Priestley (Jason Priestley’s wife) lead classes in rooms heated to around 80 degrees. Trainer Tracy Anderson of the dance-inspired cardio workout Tracy Anderson Method, a favorite of Gwyneth Paltrow, Molly Sims and Jennifer Lopez, warms her New York and Los Angeles studios to 86 degrees. Hot 8 Yoga in Beverly Hills and Santa Monica attracts their clients including Colin Farrell, Kate Hudson, Drew Barrymore and Russell Simmons, with a barre fusion class in temperatures well past 100 degrees.  And at the recently opened  Hot Pilates, which has attracted celebrity fans Dania Ramirez, Paula Patton and Abigail Spencer, the heat is cranked up to 90 to 100 degrees during their 60-minute mat classes. 

If you are planning on heating up your workout, there are some health risks involved.  According to yoga therapy expert Cora Wen, extreme heat puts dangerous stress on the body, and heat stroke can result in death.   She explains that with all the sweaty bodies in hot classes, temperatures can top 100˚ F, at which point it’s nearly impossible to cool down. In order to play it safe she suggests keeping hydrated and if there are any signs of exhaustion, light-headedness, nausea, confusion, or muscle cramping, during a workout to stop immediately.  She also warns that people who have diabetes, heart disease, lung disease or women who are pregnant may have increased risk factors. Read more about it here.  

3 Poses for Women with Breast Cancer

If you’re coping with a breast cancer diagnosis, going through treatment, or healing after surgery, try these 3 poses to calm your nervous system.

Parents rock their babies to soothe them; people stricken with grief or trauma often rock back and forth to comfort themselves. So it makes sense—and research backs this up—that rocking can calm the nervous system and assuage the fears of those coping with a breast cancer diagnosis, going through treatment, or healing postsurgery. Rocking appears to awaken the parasympathetic (relaxation) response and calm the sympathetic (stress and action) response. Moreover, it stimulates circulation and improves muscle tone and flexibility (great for lymphedema), without engaging the muscles or taxing energy.

The sloping edges of Three Minute Eggs provide a rocking motion that gives the spine a safe way to release.

While conventional yoga props allow you to experience a sense of opening and release, they don’t lend themselves well to a back-and-forth lullaby motion. So how exactly do you rock yourself into a gentle calm? I use Three Minute Eggs. Their sloping edges provide a rocking motion that gives the spine a safe way to release. This motion supports deep, conscious breathing and calms the nervous system so it can sort through—and make sense of—what’s going on. Conscious breathing helps increase oxygen exchange, circulation, and lymphatic drainage and rids the lungs of stale air, which, together with the rocking motion of the Eggs, provide a deeply healing experience. A body at rest is a body that can heal itself.

EXPLORING YOGA THERAPY WITH RENOWNED TEACHER CORA WEN

One of the fastest growing areas in the yoga world is the application of yoga as a therapeutic modality for a myriad of physical and emotional conditions. One of the most highly recognized and renowned leaders worldwide in this area is veteran yoga teacher and therapist Cora Wen. Wen, a senior ERYT-500 Yoga Alliance certified instructor and registered yoga therapist with the International Association of Yoga Therapist, recently submitted a new 1,000 hour course of study with IAYT to meet the new standards for yoga therapists set by that organization. Wen recently shared with YogaBasics her outlook (and contagious enthusiasm) for the field of yoga therapy.

YogaBasics: What exactly is yoga therapy?
Cora Wen: There seems to be some confusion about yoga therapy. We understand that sports therapy is for the athlete and dance therapy is for dancer; physical therapy is for the dancer, the athlete and the general population, but yoga therapy is not just for yoga practitioners. Yoga therapy is the therapeutic application of yoga science and art that can be used in sports, dance, physical and occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Yoga therapy is really more of a complimentary and alternative medicine. It’s for all people.

YB: People unfamiliar with yoga therapy tend to think of it as the simple application of poses as a therapeutic modality. But there is a lot more involved, right? Your program prepares therapists in the areas of physiology, psychology, anatomy, kinesiology, not to mention family and marriage therapy. Why such a breadth of study?
CW: This is preparing yoga teachers or therapists to ultimately be able to work with the medical and wellness community. There’s a lot of that that’s added to learning. It’s not just learning to do a sun salutation; it’s how we can work to use a yoga application within a clinical setting.

Comfort and Joy - Yoga Practice to Refresh

Celebrating with family and friends is one of the treasured gifts of winter. One way to enjoy it all, amid shorter days and greater demands on your time, is to incorporate more rejuvenating sequences into your regular routine. Cora Wen, a yoga teacher based in San Francisco, designed the following sequence, which will leave you feeling energized and refreshed.

Wen, who studied with Judith Hanson Lasater, travels the world teaching the fine art of restoration (or restorative yoga), but her sequence here is unique. “In restorative sequencing, the body may feel relaxed and rested, but you usually don’t want to do a lot of activity after,” Wen explains. If you want to calm and rejuvenate yourself before heading out for more activity, hold each pose for only 1 to 3 minutes, rather than what Wen describes as the typical restorative hold of 8 to 15 minutes—which might be more appropriate before bedtime.

Yoga Alliance Leadership Conference - Indian Wells, CA 2011

Getting to Know Cora Wen, E- RYT 500 We had the opportunity to interview conference speaker Cora Wen, E-RYT 500 and director of a RYS 500. Cora shared her genuine experience of transformation through Yoga, reflected passionately on the challenges of hosting teacher training, and divulged the best advice she’s ever been given as a Yoga teacher.
Read more here

Teachasana Interview with Cora Wen

We’re delighted to bring you an interview with the fabulous Cora Wen.  Crank up the volume to hear Cora’s thoughtful responses.  Many thanks to her for sharing!

p.s. Her next Sirsa after this interview was at a volcano.

Update: Here is a link to a transcript of the interview.

2010 Winter – The State of the Union (Yoga): Forecast 2010 & Beyond

Integral Yoga Magazine has always been dear to Sri Gurudev’s heart and it was through his inspiration and guidance that it took birth December 1969. Over these many years it has faithfully carried Sri Gurudev’s Teachings around the globe. It is both a vehicle of these Teachings and a way for us all to stay connected. Please consider becoming a donor!

40th Anniversary Edition

The Birth of a Magazine and a Movement
By Rev. Prem Anjali, Editor

A Direct Disciple of Paramahansa Yogananda Looks Back—and Ahead including  Interview with Roy Eugene Davis – When East Met West in Woodstock
Here is a sample article by Philip Goldberg Is Yoga Hindu?

  • This is Yoga—Sri Swami Satchidananda
  • A Direct Disciple of Paramahansa Yogananda Looks Back and Ahead—Roy Eugene Davis
  • The Call of Yoga—Rama Jyoti Vernon
  • Is Yoga Hindu?—Graham Schweig, PhD
  • Remember the Source—John Friend
  • Service: The Future of Yoga—Seane Corn
  • Going Fast, Getting Nowhere—Swami Karunananda
  • The Fulfillment of Yoga—Nischala Devi
  • Bringing Back the Unity in Yoga—Mukunda Stiles
  • The Fullness of Yoga—Sonia Sumar
  • Climbing the Mountain: A Lost Tradition?—Cora Wen
  • Teaching to Learn—Kira Ryder
  • Building a Yoga Bridge—Tilak Pyle
  • Teaching Integral Yoga: Responsibility and Privilege—Dijon Carew
  • When East Met West in Woodstock—Philip Goldberg
  • Patanjali’s Yoga—Rev. Jaganath Carrera
  • The True Test of One’s Practice—Kia Scherr

Yoga Journal Thailand Interview – Teacher Highlight 2009

Getting to Know Cora Wen, E- RYT 500 We had the opportunity to interview conference speaker Cora Wen, E-RYT 500 and director of a RYS 500. Cora shared her genuine experience of transformation through Yoga, reflected passionately on the challenges of hosting teacher training, and divulged the best advice she’s ever been given as a Yoga teacher.
Read more here

FEATURED TEACHER: CORA WEN 2016

Interviewed by Charmie Stryker 

Today we have the honor of getting to know international yogi, designer, and “chanting cat lady” Cora Wen! Cora Wen is one of our studio’s most iconic teachers who leads advanced workshops, restorative trainings, and yoga classes!

(YGSF) Tell us about yourself! What was your first job? Any fun hobbies or personal interests?

I was born in Hong Kong and moved to the US when I was about 10 years old. We also lived in Taiwan and Switzerland before moving to New York. I’ve always felt that one of my feet is still planted in traditional Chinese values, and the other is moving with the pace of the changing Western world.

I’ve continued to nurture my Asian roots by returning to teach yoga and participate in local communities in Thailand, Malaysia and the Himalayas.

In the 70’s I lived in NY and worked with Stephen Sprouse, making clothes and stage wear for legendary rockers Debbie Harry/Blondie, Patty Smith, Angie Bowie and the Clash. It led me to a career in fashion and merchandising throughout the late 70s and 80s.

By the 1990s I was a corporate banker. I left that career to teach yoga full-time in 2001. I love to travel to new places, and this year we will be exploring Vietnam for a few weeks, and then teaching in the South.

Gardening is a passion of mine, and we are planting loads of veggies this summer! I’m also a knitter, and sometimes known as the crazy chanting cat yogi on Youtube ?

FEATURED TEACHER: CORA WEN 2015

Interviewed by Charmie Stryker September 4, 2015

Cora has become such a coveted teacher here at Yoga Garden SF for her alignment based yoga classes, teacher trainings and workshops.  She doesn’t just bring her anatomy background into her classes but also her funky style and sense of humor which creates a beautiful energy that encourages and nurture her students .We’re honored to have such an amazing teacher as part of our family, and we couldn’t wait to learn more about her journey!

(YGSF) Tell us about yourself! What was your first job? Any fun hobbies or personal interests?

(Cora) I grew up in a traditional Chinese family in Asia and the West, and took refuge in the Buddha as a teen. An international childhood in Hong Kong and Indonesia, Switzerland, Australia and the US, has instilled the spirit of a traveling adventurer.

After a start with Stephen Sprouse in rock fashion in New York City in the 70s for legendary rockers Deborah Harry, the Clash and Patti Smith, I had extended careers in retail and fashion merchandising for ESPRIT and Comme des Garçons and a corporate banking career developing eCommerce for Lockheed Martin and Nestlè International.

Since 1994, I’ve taught yoga, mentored by America’s traditional Yoga lineage, learning and assisting Judith Hanson Lasater, Patricia Walden, Erich Schiffmann and Rodney Yee 1992-2011

When I am not standing on my head, I also love gardening and garden design, am and avid knitter, and sometimes known as the crazy cat chanting lady on Youtube ?

iHanuman Teacher Feature

Cora Wen is a yoga therapist and founder of the Yoga Bloom Advanced Yoga Training 300-hour program. As a yoga teacher’s teacher, her lineage spans two decades and she is a virtual who’s who among American yoga “pioneers.” Her funky style fuses her playfulness, anatomical precision, and Chinese Meridian magic. Cora sheds a refreshingly unique light on asana, while imparting ancient wisdom of the ages. Open to beauty in the imperfect and the acceptance of change in body, mind, and spirit.Cora’s Website: www.corawen.com

Where in the World is Cora Wen

This was originally posted on Cora’s Facebook page.

CORA WEN grew up in a traditional Chinese family in Asia and the West, and took refuge in the Buddha as a teen. An international childhood growing up in Hong Kong and Indonesia, Switzerland, Australia and the US, has instilled the spirit of a travelling adventurer. After sowing wild oats in New York City in the 70s with rockers Deborah Harry and Patti Smith, she had careers in fashion and banking. Since 1994, Cora has taught Yoga, mentored by America’s most influential Yoga lineage. She has been dedicated since 2002 in support of indigenous culture for exiled Tibetan people and land mine victims. Find her at www.corawen.com.

YogaVibes Snaps Up Exclusive Online Streaming of Wanderlust Classes

We’ve had an announcement we’ve been sitting on because, well, other crazy events have occurred. But here we are, ready to tell you! Ah but first, another announcement!

Some of you may already be familiar with subscription based online yoga class site YogaVibes.com, and perhaps a handful of you have heard of Wanderlust Festival, yes?

Cora Wen Demos ‘Headless’ Headstand (video)

Have you heard about the Sirsasana Challenge 2010? It’s on! Read this post featuring impromptu-Sirsa queen Cora Wen, and view the first photos on the YD facebook page to get an idea!
So speaking of Cora, and headstands, how bout a little how-to video featuring both? For this one there are lots of fun props, but you don’t even need a head! Kinda. The “headless headstand” is perfect for yogis squeamish about smooshing their noggins, and excellent for anyone with neck or back issues who shouldn’t compress the spine. Just watch. Take it away Ms. Yogacrone! (we love that she says hello to “yogadorks” ? )

Meet Cora Wen! And the Sirsasana Challenge, It’s On 2010

She calls it Sirsa Graffiti Around the World. We call it Awesome! Meet Cora Wen! The world traveling yogini who makes it her business to share her ever expanding knowledge of yoga through teacher trainings and workshops all over the globe, and on her head! See if you can spot the stillness of a yogi in the video above.

We love Cora for her buoyant spirit and infectiously zestful cheer. Having studied with the likes of Erich Schiffmann, Patricia Walden and Judith Hanson Lasater, Cora is a teacher’s teacher and we greatly admire her contribution to the world of yoga. AND for telling us all about our mudras – a fave of her recent blog posts, Mudras and Meaning. But what really has us going bonkers? Cora, upside down, all over the world! Cora Wen is the sirsa garden gnome of yoga! —Do not try (most of) this at home yogadorks.

Teachers on Tour

Our new blog folows teachers on their adventures around the world. Thismonth; Follow Iyengar teacher Cora Wen on her Magical Mystical Tour through the Himnalays and Bhutan. blogs.yogajournal.com/teachers/teachers_on_tour

Find her at www.corawen.com.

MEDIA: BY CORA WEN

Articles by Cora Wen

Props Are Friends

With so many kinds of yoga classes offered around town or at your gym, it can be hard to choose the right one for you, especially if you aren’t well versed in the yogi language. For example, while Hot and Power Yoga focus on blasting calories, Yin and Taoist are more meditative, and Therapeutic is great for anyone suffering from a physical injury or trauma. In this informative slideshow, LivingHealthy expert and founder of Yoga Bloom, Cora Wen, breaks down 12 of the most popular types of yoga, explaining everything from what they’re about and what to expect in a class to what celebrities and personality types can be found bending, posing and chanting their way through classes. Namaste!

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Find the Best Yoga Teacher for You

Don’t hit the mat without this instructor checklist.

As we all know, a school is only as good as its teachers. Its a principle that applies especially to modern-day yoga, where there is such a wide range of skills and experience among instructors. Finding the right teacher can mean the difference between dropping out after one class and sustaining a long-term practice capable of changing your life.

Once youve narrowed down your options for the type of yoga you want to practice (see find the right yoga studio), its time to start shopping for teachers. Check out their professional bios; get some word-of-mouth references from students or colleagues. Then go sample a class and, if possible, chat with them afterwards. 

Here are the questions to ask:

Find the Right Yoga Studio

Take any yoga class and chances are you’ll be asked to turn upside down. Most yogis swear by such inversions, claiming they offer a slew of benefits, from calming the nervous system to stimulating the brain. But is upending yourself safe?

While inversions are typically defined as any pose (asana) in which your head is lower than your heart, they can vary in exerted effort and impact, says LivingHealthy expert Cora Wen, a yoga therapist whose clients include Mariel Hemingway and Ben Folds. Postures such as headstands (which Wen practices daily) or handstands—where body weight is balanced on the head or hands—are strengthening and energizing. Inversely, poses such as forward bend or downward dog—where the feet are grounded and the head hangs freely—are more restorative.

According to Wen, both types change the circulation pathway in the body. And that reversal of blood flow feels good. After three to five minutes in a headstand, you can feel the fluids start to drain out of the feet and legs. No wonder doctors recommend elevating the feet once a day (legs up-the-wall in the yoga world) to help relieve heaviness around the ankles and prevent varicose veins.

Who Turned Up the Heat?

Hot Yoga is just the beginning.

The concept of practicing yoga in a heated room started in the late 1970s when a man named Bikram brought his version of yoga to America. Hot Yoga was a marketing coup; over subsequent decades, it has become wildly popular. And now this craze has permeated the entire fitness arena, with the likes of Hot Pilates, Hot Spin, Hot Barre and Hot TRX cropping up everywhere. Gyms and fitness centers are warming their classrooms from 90 to 117 degrees, and everybody is ernestly sweating their way through “intense” workouts.

Is hotter better? Let’s examine some of the myths and concerns behind this sizzling trend.  

First, it’s important to remember that traditional yoga in India was practiced at dawn and dusk–not in the midday heat—for good reason. Gently stretching our muscles is desirable; over-stretching ligaments and tendons is not. At higher temperatures, you feel more flexible than you really are, making it easier to over-stretch and get hurt. 

3 Poses for Women with Breast Cancer

If you’re coping with a breast cancer diagnosis, going through treatment, or healing after surgery, try these 3 poses to calm your nervous system.

Parents rock their babies to soothe them; people stricken with grief or trauma often rock back and forth to comfort themselves. So it makes sense—and research backs this up—that rocking can calm the nervous system and assuage the fears of those coping with a breast cancer diagnosis, going through treatment, or healing postsurgery. Rocking appears to awaken the parasympathetic (relaxation) response and calm the sympathetic (stress and action) response. Moreover, it stimulates circulation and improves muscle tone and flexibility (great for lymphedema), without engaging the muscles or taxing energy.

The sloping edges of Three Minute Eggs provide a rocking motion that gives the spine a safe way to release.

While conventional yoga props allow you to experience a sense of opening and release, they don’t lend themselves well to a back-and-forth lullaby motion. So how exactly do you rock yourself into a gentle calm? I use Three Minute Eggs. Their sloping edges provide a rocking motion that gives the spine a safe way to release. This motion supports deep, conscious breathing and calms the nervous system so it can sort through—and make sense of—what’s going on. Conscious breathing helps increase oxygen exchange, circulation, and lymphatic drainage and rids the lungs of stale air, which, together with the rocking motion of the Eggs, provide a deeply healing experience. A body at rest is a body that can heal itself.

Comfort and Joy - Yoga Practice to Refresh

Celebrating with family and friends is one of the treasured gifts of winter. One way to enjoy it all, amid shorter days and greater demands on your time, is to incorporate more rejuvenating sequences into your regular routine. Cora Wen, a yoga teacher based in San Francisco, designed the following sequence, which will leave you feeling energized and refreshed.

Wen, who studied with Judith Hanson Lasater, travels the world teaching the fine art of restoration (or restorative yoga), but her sequence here is unique. “In restorative sequencing, the body may feel relaxed and rested, but you usually don’t want to do a lot of activity after,” Wen explains. If you want to calm and rejuvenate yourself before heading out for more activity, hold each pose for only 1 to 3 minutes, rather than what Wen describes as the typical restorative hold of 8 to 15 minutes—which might be more appropriate before bedtime.

Harmonising Yin Yang - published in Yoga Journal Thailand 2011

Celebrating with family and friends is one of the treasured gifts of winter. One way to enjoy it all, amid shorter days and greater demands on your time, is to incorporate more rejuvenating sequences into your regular routine. Cora Wen, a yoga teacher based in San Francisco, designed the following sequence, which will leave you feeling energized and refreshed.

Wen, who studied with Judith Hanson Lasater, travels the world teaching the fine art of restoration (or restorative yoga), but her sequence here is unique. “In restorative sequencing, the body may feel relaxed and rested, but you usually don’t want to do a lot of activity after,” Wen explains. If you want to calm and rejuvenate yourself before heading out for more activity, hold each pose for only 1 to 3 minutes, rather than what Wen describes as the typical restorative hold of 8 to 15 minutes—which might be more appropriate before bedtime.

#NowStartsNow by Cora Wen

#NowStartsNow by Cora Wen

I started yoga practice as a young corporate banker making my way in the world. It was a way to exercise, focus my mind and direct my stressed out energy. I went for asana, movement and more on the mat, and in my life.

Now, as my practice has matured, I have found that asana has been a pathway to find deeper and deeper states of consciousness and awareness. After 30 years of practice, and 23 years of teaching, yoga is my life within every pore of my being. And my feet have been grounded to earth, as I have raised my arms and heart toward the sky.

Years ago, I came to each practice with fire and determination to “get” the asanas – Chakrasana, Kapotasana, Vrksasana, Adho Mukha Vrksasana, Tittibasana, and the rest of the more difficult asanas. The ones in the “back of the book”.

As the asanas came to me through practice, practice, practice, I have found more ease and stability in holding them longer and with more grace moving in and out. Now, I find myself lingering in the asana, instead of struggling into them.

Now, I can find the time and spaciousness in my chest, side ribs, paraspinal muscles without as much struggle. Though perhaps these days, it takes a bit more time as my body ages and changes. But now, I focus on the breath, the subtle alignment, the way I move into and out of an asana. The journey has certainly replaced the destination on my mat.

Cyber Sangha Reflections, Svadhyaya and Growing Your Practice

Two years ago, I wrote a year-end reflection about what I had seen beautifully develop in the cyber sangha. In that piece, I shared that “the cyber sangha has sometimes proven a greater support than studio communities.”

And my, how that has been true these past two years.

I have connected with many more people online since then – from around the world and in my own backyard. Through social media, I have met people who are today students in my advanced yoga teacher training, have participated in my retreats or have met me for tea and a chat. The world has truly become closer through the communications available to us. It’s incredible.

Shifting Tides
As we have also seen this year, though, this explosive growth of the online community has brought many of us clarity about our roles in our offline communities. Some of us have changed traditions while others of us have become stronger in our lineage.

I suppose this is to be expected; it’s an ebb and flow that we often see in traditions such as yoga, or even Buddhism. The more it expands out, the more people can get clear about what it is that they are truly looking for.

Happy Buddha Day! What You Always Wanted to Know About Buddhas Birthday by Cora Wen

Today is Buddha’s Birthday. The full moon in May is one of the most auspicious and significant days In the Buddhist tradition. On the night of the  full moon, people all over the world honour the birth, enlightenment and death of the Buddha. It is known as Buddha Day or Buddhas Birthday. In 2011 the full moon is on May 17.

This celebration is called Vesak for the month name in the Indian calendar.  Vesak,Visakha or Wesak Puja is a sacred day of rededication to Dhamma and the Eightfold Path.Vesākha/Vaiśākha व”शाख is celebrated in Nepal, Singapore,Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Bangledesh, Indonesia and India. Tibetan is Saga Dawa Duchen – ས་ག་$་བ། Saga Dawa sa ga zla ba dus chen which fell on May 15, 2011.

Buddha Day celebrates Siddhartha Gautama sitting under the bodhi tree in Bodh Gaya, India and attaining enlightenment over 2,500 years ago. After 49 days of sitting, Gautama awoke and saw the world and began sharing with others. He became Buddha, the awakened one.

I’ve always thought Buddhists create an easy way to celebrate – we only have to remember one day a year and it encompasses the triple gem of the Buddhas journey, encompassing the birth, enlightenment-Nirvana and ascent-Parinirvana of Gautama Buddha.

Though schools of Buddhism may differ in calendars, another day to celebrate enlightenment might be a good thought for the day. As we celebrate the enlightenment of the Buddha, remember the message of wisdom and compassion. Love and acceptance. As the moon rises over the horizon, throwing white light onto us, let us respect all religions, and celebrate all beings and beliefs.

Heading into 2010; Yoga Brightens the World

Year in Review

Elephant Journal asked me to share reflections of 2009: inspirations, celebrations, and ways to close the year. I thought about events of the year, and the interesting anniversaries of political and cultural changes, from the 20th anniversary of Tianamen Square, 30th anniversary of US embassy takeoverin Iran, 40th anniversary of  WoodstockSesame Street and the Moon landing, 50th anniversary of Tibet National Uprising Day when His Holiness the Dalai Lama fled into exile coinciding with the 60th anniversary of the Chinese Communist party. So many major social events happen as years shift into new decades…has this year changed us more than we realise?

A New York Yoga Dork Minute with YogaCrone

A few months ago, I went to New York to teach Yoga workshops, visit family and thought it might be fun to hunt for the YogaDork

I love YogaDork for many reasons, but one of them is ’cause she loves my Sirsa Graffitti, so we have a healthy Crone-Dork appreciation of each other! I decided to look for the Dork around NYC and what better way to hunt for another yogi than by Sirsa Tagging the city.

As the YogaDork joins Elephant, this YogaCrone is sending a cyber “header” and heart full of love to ye!

WHY 108 Sun Salutations…?

Have you ever wondered about the Significance of the number 108? Why do we do 108 Backbend Dropbacks or 108 Sun Salutations in Yoga…?

I have looked up many of the symbology and would love to hear more….

108 has been a sacred number for a long time, and this number is explained in many different ways. Traditionally, Buddhist have 108 beads in a mala, representing the 108 human passions that Avalokiteshvara assumed when counting the beads. This number ensures a repetition of a sacred mantra at least 100 times, the extra beads allowing for any omissions made through absentmindness in counting or for loss or breakage of beads.

Regardless of the meaning of 108, it is important that if a mala is used to count mantras, the mantra be given sincerity, devotion, feeling, and full attention.

Do you know your mudras? More info Here

More Articles on Elephant Journal Here

CORA WEN grew up in a traditional Chinese family in Asia and the West, and took refuge in the Buddha as a teen. An international childhood growing up in Hong Kong and Indonesia, Switzerland, Australia and the US, has instilled the spirit of a travelling adventurer. After sowing wild oats in New York City in the 70s with rockers Deborah Harry and Patti Smith, she had careers in fashion and banking. Since 1994, Cora has taught Yoga, mentored by America’s most influential Yoga lineage. She has been dedicated since 2002 in support of indigenous culture for exiled Tibetan people and land mine victims. Find her at www.corawen.com.

Audio & Video Interviews

Listen to interviews with Cora Wen

Training and Practicing in Yoga Therapeutics

The question of yoga’s “do-ability” as a therapeutic and restorative tool is reflective of how it fits into the dual worlds of traditional and medical healing. Its capacity to balance a holistic care model with its pathology-focused counterpart is what makes yoga a keystone of developing integrative medical departments. While alternative and complementary treatments are receiving more attention in studies and patient care plans, there is still a great deal of criticism and even hostility to integrative medicine within the conventional medical world. When presented with the opportunities of a newly elected Obama administration open to discussion around the role of science and the field of healthcare back in 2009, top scientists jumped at the chance to advocate for the defunding of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, a division of the U.S. National Institutes of Health originally created in 1992. Concerned that the NIH was funding “pseudoscience”, Steven Salzberg, a genome researcher and computational biologist at the University of Maryland, disparaged alternative medicine research for its lack of rigorous controls and studies. His colleague, Steven Novella, a neurologist at the Yale School of Medicine, further claimed that the NCCAM was being “used to lend an appearance of legitimacy to treatments that are not legitimate.”

New Resolutions for the New Year - Happy Monkey Year 2016

February 9, 2016 This week’s topic: Happy Monkey Year! Interviews: Cora Wen, yoga instructor Sangeeta Kaur, musician Featured Music: Monkey, Joss Jaffe Cat Bui, Sangeeta Kaur Gayatri Mantra, Sangeeta Kaur

Free Guided Meditation @YogaVibes

Cora Wen shares a simple and short guided meditation in this online yoga video. (15 mins.)

Free Online Yoga Class @YogaVibes

Free class! Every couple of weeks or so we’ll be rotating out this free online yoga class hosted by YogaVibes. First up the lovely Cora Wen.

This online yoga class with Cora Wen guides you through seated hip openers and a twisting cycle. Perfect for beginning and winding down a practice of twists, hip openers, shoulder openers and backbends. (22 mins.)

Episode 64 - So You Think You Can Teach? Part 1, 2012

This week’s topic: So You Think You Can Teach, Part 1

Interviews: Cora Wen, yoga instructor
Annie Carpenter, yoga instructor
Joan Hyman, yoga instructor

August 1, 2012

Yoga in My School Episode #67 – Chinese New Year 2011

Celebrated yoga instructor Cora Wen shares her extensive knowledge regarding Chinese traditions as they relate to Chinese New Year and the Chinese Zodiac. Discover how the animals were chosen, the influence of the elements and much more. Most importantly Cora will share practices to align your life, home and yoga practice with the year and the seasons to encourage peace, prosperity, longevity and good fortune. Gong Xi Fa Cai!

Yoga in My School Episode – Reflections 2010 by Cora Wen

Cora talks about her recent travels through the Himalayas and South East Asia, her Yoga Journal conference experiences and how she balances east and west

The Athlete Within Summit 2.0

Are you tired of looking in the mirror and not liking what you see? Do you say no to activities that sound fun but seem impossible due to your weight or your sedentary habits? Are you finally ready to create REAL MIND/BODY HEALTH AND LASTING HAPPINESS?

This is about REAL health and life-long vitality. No more yo-yo dieting. No more exercise fads. No more starts and stops and start overs. There’s just so much conflicting information on fitness and nutrition! It’s time to learn the truth behind lasting, vibrant health.

I’m excited to be part of Renée Ramsdell’s virtual event. She has brought together 22 AMAZING experts to help you ditch the guilt, shame and confusion around weight loss and fitness, and replace them with simple strategies that work to EMPOWER you! It’s all the mind/body wellness information you’ve been searching for.

We are Doctors, Coaches, Psychologists, Nutritionists, Motivators and Athletes! Many of us have had our own issues with lack of fitness, poor body image, and an unhealthy relationship with food – and our personal stories reflect that. Together, we’ll reach lasting mind/body health! 

Mind, Body & Spirit Wellness Summit

Do you want better health in mind, body or spirit? Have you tried different programs and not found the results you hoped for? Join me and Tricia Gunnerson on the free, online Mind, Body & Spirit Wellness Summit featuring 21+ experts to give you the tools and information you need to jumpstart your wellness!

Take the opportunity to discover simple techniques and effective methods to take control of your wellness! The Mind, Body & Spirit Wellness Summit is FREE to you!