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style: Props 101

duration: 65 min

Prevention Yoga – Case Study – Upper Cross Syndrome

We look at Upper Cross syndrome and the effect of neck, shoulder and hand issues. We use the wall and chair with some blocks and yoga belt for assistance.

 

We look at Upper Cross syndrome and the effect of neck, shoulder and hand issues. We use the wall and chair with some blocks and yoga belt for assistance.

Upper cross syndrome means your neck is forward and your shoulders are hunched over. The neck goes into flexion, meaning the traps and neck muscles go into overdrive to  hold it up (stiff neck?). The shoulders roll forward and get hunched, limiting their ability to rotate outwards. This is part of the culprit of rotator cuff or elbow injuries.

You can’t get comfortable while sleeping (neck pain), or suffering from headaches. Your head position throughout the day might be the first thing to evaluate.

"Upper-Crossed Syndrome (UCS) is also referred to as proximal or shoulder girdle crossed syndrome. In UCS, tightness of the upper trapezius and levator scapula on the dorsal side crosses with tightness of the pectoralis major and minor. Weakness of the deep cervical flexors ventrally crosses with weakness of the middle and lower trapezius. This pattern of imbalance creates joint dysfunction, particularly at the atlanto-occipital joint, C4-C5 segment, cervicothoracic joint, glenohumeral joint, and T4-T5 segment. Janda noted that these focal areas of stress within the spine correspond to transitional zones in which neighboring vertebrae change in morphology. Specific postural changes are seen in UCS, including forward head posture, increased cervical lordosis and thoracic kyphosis, elevated and protracted shoulders, and rotation or abduction and winging of the scapulae. These postural changes decrease glenohumeral stability as the glenoid fossa becomes more vertical due to serratus anterior weakness leading to abduction, rotation, and winging of the scapulae. This loss of stability requires the levator scapula and upper trapezius to increase activation to maintain glenohumeral centration." (Janda 1988).

Cora Wen

Over the past 25 years, Cora Wen has built her reputation as an internationally acclaimed yoga practitioner and teacher.

Learn more about Cora